As I’ve said before, I have loved to write ever since I was in middle school. Honestly, it probably all began because someone told me I was good at it. I always wrote in a diary in elementary and middle school; they’re pretty hilarious to read now. In middle school, I loved to write short creative stories and poems. I entered a few contests and won a few excellence in writing awards. In high school, things changed. I stopped writing creatively for the most part. Probably because I was going through a rebellious teen phase and didn’t have the time. Before I knew it, I was applying for colleges and had to decide at 17 what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. I knew I didn’t want to just write nonfiction books so I decided on journalism. My high school didn’t offer anything like this but I went to college with journalism on the mind, majoring in Communication Studies. I fell in love with journalism in college right from the get-go but felt an even stronger pull my sophomore year in a Feature Writing course.

My Communication Studies program is very broad and students cannot concentrate on a particular field. So I’ve learned all about media, broadcasting, human relationships, and journalism. Right away I started writing for the student newspaper and within my first year, I had one journalism class under my belt.

I chose journalism because I see the importance of news. News. Not biased opinion pieces. That’s not what I want to do. I want to give people the facts they deserve. I don’t want to write for someone else who’s going to tell me, that’s too controversial. If you write that, I’ll fire you. No thank you. If it’s the facts and it’s important to the public, then they deserve to know. After all, one of the journalistic obligations is to monitor power and how can one do that without  writing honestly about those who have gone power crazy?

I chose journalism because I love meeting new people with interesting stories. I love telling their stories because they feel like they can’t for whatever reason, or they want to reach a broader audience, or they thought no one cared. People do amazing things with their lives and I want to be able to give them the recognition they deserve. Hearing their stories fascinates and inspires me. This is what I love about journalism the most.

People are quick to hate on journalists and journalism these days. There is a lot of bias and false information out there today. A good, honest journalist doesn’t do that. That’s not my dream. My wish is for people to give journalism a chance to prove itself again. Okay so the journalists who are well-known for being biased and crappy, maybe not so much. But to those who have such a passion for journalism and have so much potential, give them a chance. We’re spiraling downhill fast. People don’t bother reading or listening to any type of news outlet because they don’t trust the source so they walk around unaware of the world around them. But without news, we wouldn’t know who was running for president, what the weather for tomorrow will be, or where the latest devastation occurred. People would be limited to those who they are able to help, simply because they are unaware of what is going on in the world. If we were a newsless world, we would be ignorantly breezing through our lives, not fully enjoying ourselves.

I could go on forever about why I want to become a journalist, but I’ll only give one last reason. Journalist have the power to control what is covered in the news obviously. So much of it is too goddamn negative. Media outlets say it’s the war, blood, and anger that makes a story that people want to read. I disagree. Stories that tell a something positive can gain just as much readership as the stories that tell the world’s atrocities. In a world so full of hate, we need to shine more light on its goodness.

Mahatma Ghandi once said, “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” This is what I intend to do.